Informal survey

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snippety
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Re: Informal survey

Post by snippety » Mon Sep 23, 2019 5:39 am

PS what has happened to conversation.....so true about being talked 'at' and not 'talk with' !!

i just graciously keep away / avoid. perhaps they are young?, insecure if they need to inform you of their status and pedigree...?. proof is in the pudding..as they say.

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mdmattin
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Re: Informal survey

Post by mdmattin » Tue Sep 24, 2019 12:37 am

Hi Snippety,
That does sound wonderful - to spend a day with art friends old and new. Was the class on a particular topic? What have you been learning about color and pigment? I find that to be a never ending source of fascination. Are you learning from any particular books or websites?
There has been a renaissance of traditional art knowledge being rediscovered and reinvented with modern materials and technology.
Do you think we have lost some freedom in the process? Can we use the tools of the past to create art that grapples with the issues of the present?
All things we might talk with each other about.

Matthew

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Rebecca
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Re: Informal survey

Post by Rebecca » Tue Sep 24, 2019 4:28 pm

snippety wrote:
Mon Sep 23, 2019 5:27 am
... I studied art a long time ago and often think of the things that werent taught. the up side is that things were a bit more 'radical' and free form back then. Also there is SO much more information now, that my knowledge of art practice and art history has exploded.
Yes, back in college, no teacher ever recited their training lineage to us (but they had them). They refused to give any formal training, and instead, they gave their captive audiences (us) inane stories about their exceptional selves. How presumptuous. What a waste of tuition. I wonder if they hoped we would spread the word about their specialness? That didn't work, but the special lineage story does. By nature, the lineage story is viral. Students who sit before a teacher who recites it, will likely turn around and recite it again, adding their teacher to the chain. And some of those students will become teachers, and the cycle continues.
There is always a lineage, no matter what period a student is trained in. We all have a lineage that can trace to some big name. If you absorb a good art book, or watch a valuable training video, you have a lineage to trace. Schools and the teachers they hire are containers of lineages. More important than that, a lineage is only as good as its weakest link. I wish this form of social introduction would fizzle. Ghah!
Last edited by Rebecca on Tue Sep 24, 2019 6:32 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Rebecca

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Rebecca
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Re: Informal survey

Post by Rebecca » Tue Sep 24, 2019 4:32 pm

mdmattin wrote:
Tue Sep 24, 2019 12:37 am
Hi Snippety,...Are you learning from any particular books or websites?
There has been a renaissance of traditional art knowledge being rediscovered and reinvented with modern materials and technology.
Do you think we have lost some freedom in the process? Can we use the tools of the past to create art that grapples with the issues of the present?
All things we might talk with each other about.
I'm looking forward to this conversation. Please chime in, Snippety.
Rebecca

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Re: Informal survey

Post by Rebecca » Mon Sep 30, 2019 3:42 am

mdmattin wrote:
There has been a renaissance of traditional art knowledge being rediscovered and reinvented with modern materials and technology.
Do you think we have lost some freedom in the process? Can we use the tools of the past to create art that grapples with the issues of the present?
I'm trying to imagine what type of freedom might be lost in this regard. Just submitting to the discipline of a tradition might squeeze the options a bit. On the other hand, no one is required to go traditional. The artist has to want it in the first place.

I believe traditional tools, materials, ideas, composition and style can be exhumed to very effectively update our human story.
Rebecca

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mdmattin
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Re: Informal survey

Post by mdmattin » Mon Sep 30, 2019 9:40 pm

I asked that in response to
snippety wrote:
Mon Sep 23, 2019 5:27 am
I studied art a long time ago and often think of the things that werent taught. the up side is that things were a bit more 'radical' and free form back then.
I believe wholeheartedly in using traditional methods to do contemporary art. Much of the traditional knowledge is based on the laws of physics and human perception and cognition, fundamental things that still apply. And the "traditional" artists were the contemporary artists of their own times. At the same time, our times demand that we be more radical and freeform than ever - the old thinking is killing us, and there are fantastic opportunities at hand if we can only grasp them. Art is where we explore the possibilities that we didn't know where there until we sketched them out on a napkin.
But a little knowledge of perspective and anatomy doesn't hurt while we're doing it.

Matthew

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Andre Jute
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Re: Informal survey

Post by Andre Jute » Tue Oct 01, 2019 10:22 am

mdmattin wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 9:40 pm
But a little knowledge of perspective and anatomy doesn't hurt while we're doing it.
The danger is that without at least a little craft, which takes a bit of study and effort, the would-be artist can cripple himself with frustration at the gap between vision and expression well before he reaches the point where he can...
mdmattin wrote:
Mon Sep 30, 2019 9:40 pm
...explore the possibilities that we didn't know where there until we sketched them out on a napkin.
In my experience "free expression" is reserved for those who have put in the time and the effort. That's why nothing greases the wheels of work like constant practice.
Andre Jute
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snippety
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Re: Informal survey

Post by snippety » Tue Oct 29, 2019 10:09 am

whoa - i need a door bell ( re Rebecca s - 'chime in' ) sorry for delay

where does one start on their art journey? Getting back to the learning environment and being a student some 40 (!) years ago...the first year art school was great as it set a foundation for - everything. ie how to look at things/life around us, and how to apply some creative thinking - basically problem solving. It was the start of 'self directed learning' and thats been with me ever since.

big leap...a few years ago when i was "laid up" and couldnt do much i decided to get back to and tackle that huge era " the Renaissance" as its such a big, daunting and turning point period, it can be hard to find an entry point. I was lucky to find a book by Theodore Rabb - the Last Days of the Renaissance. I dont want to get anyones expectations up by saying how much i loved reading this book - but its so well written, accessible and even ..humorous.
Then last year i signed up to a great (free) online course via https://www.edx.org/ -Science in Art: the chemistry of art materials and conservation and also The Architectural Imagination. i found these to be excellently presented and great content.

I was lucky enough to have had some very modest sales this year - so i was looking to spend my art $ and scouting around on parkablogs ( thankyou for all your great info) when i found myself reading up on Kremer paints; yes lots of info there, but this lead me to Handprint and Bruce McEvoy site. wow! my head was truly in such a great place that week.

lastly to pick up on Andres point about what you are trying to achieve / artistic vision and the skills to get there. to have the time to make mistakes, try out materials...and keeping it simple. practice. we all accept the sports people who put in hours of practice to be top of their game.

snippety
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Re: Informal survey

Post by snippety » Tue Oct 29, 2019 10:32 am

mdmattin wrote:
Tue Sep 24, 2019 12:37 am
Hi Snippety,
That does sound wonderful - to spend a day with art friends old and new. Was the class on a particular topic? What have you been learning about color and pigment? I find that to be a never ending source of fascination. Are you learning from any particular books or websites?
There has been a renaissance of traditional art knowledge being rediscovered and reinvented with modern materials and technology.
Do you think we have lost some freedom in the process? Can we use the tools of the past to create art that grapples with the issues of the present?
All things we might talk with each other about.

Matthew
you know - im not sure what i can tell you / (articulate) about my adventure with colour, other than seeing the world with new eyes and having a much greater appreciation of what is in my tubes of paint. there s a lot more technical information about pigments and products. i was even interested to read about Mazda red!
Thats a good question about freedom Matthew - we should have more freedom! reality is less freedom tho with interruptions and distractions?
less discipline.
i snt there a 'rule of thumb' something along the line of 1 3rd study research / 1 3rd practice / 1 3rd maintenance / materials ??

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